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The day in history: Dec. 10, 1992

Slumping economy brings rise IN abuse, depression and divorce A faltering economy was bringing with it a rise in depression and domestic abuse, the Women's Resource Centre in Fort St. John said on this day in history.
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North Peace Secondary student Darren Esau tries his hand as a mechanic as part of a career exploration program at the school in 1992.

Slumping economy brings rise IN abuse, depression and divorce

A faltering economy was bringing with it a rise in depression and domestic abuse, the Women's Resource Centre in Fort St. John said on this day in history.

Director Ellen Sinclair told the Alaska Highway News the centre was witnessing a dramatic rise in the number of clients reporting abuse. The number of people seeking legal advice on divorce and separation had also risen, she said.

"If people are having problems at home and there's a lack of money, it seems to make them worse," Sinclair said. "You get tense, you get worried. It makes things a lot harder."

The Christmas season was generally a calm time of year for violence reports, Sinclair added, particularly compared to the heavy demand the centre saw in late spring and early summer.

 

Building permits lag

Building permit values in 1992 continued to slump compared to 1991, the News reported.

The value of permits had only hit $6.1 million for the year by the end of November, well short of the $15.4 million in value seen the year prior.

A total of 207 building permits had been issued to the end of November, with commercial permits accounting for nearly half of total values at $2.6 million.

 

Local man appointed to provincial economy and environment committee

Fort St. John resident Jim Little found himself elected to the NDP's standing committee on the economy and the environment in the legislature, it was reported on this day in 1992.

The long-time resident had a big task ahead of him, representing six northern B.C. ridings at the table, including the Peace River, Prince George, Omenica, and Cariboo regions.

The committee was to meet five times a year on economy and environmental matters in the province.

 

Residents oppose selling smokes to minors

More than 90 per cent of British Columbians opposed selling cigarettes to minors, a new survey revealed in 1992.

British Columbians found the federal regulation system too lax to ban the sales, according to a news report.

The survey found residents preferred a photo ID system for anyone wanting to buy a pack of smokes, and fining stores that sold to minors, along with revoking the store's tobacco retail licence.