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This day in history: Jan. 6, 1966

Babysitter saves five A 14-year-old teen showed "great presence of mind" when she awoke at 3 a.m. New Year's Day in 1966 and smelled smoke in a home in the Fort St. John trailer court, the Alaska Highway News reported on this day in history.
history
Patricia Louise Arntson was the first baby of 1966 in the North Peace, arriving at 16 minutes past minute on Jan. 2. Shown here with her mother, Mrs. Edwin Arntson of Fort St. John, Patricia weighed nine pounds and 12 ounces.

Babysitter saves five

A 14-year-old teen showed "great presence of mind" when she awoke at 3 a.m. New Year's Day in 1966 and smelled smoke in a home in the Fort St. John trailer court, the Alaska Highway News reported on this day in history.

Alyson Clark was in charge of the five children of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Horning, and got up at once to take the children outside to safety.

"I got the children into their boots, wrapped blankets around the baby and sent the oldest child with the baby to my own home," Clark told the News.

"I wrapped blankets around the rest and carried the five-year-old and the other two walked over to my home."

It was the second fire the family had suffered in recent months, the News reported. Five months prior, the family lost most of their clothing in a car fire.

There were few details reported about the house fire, however, the community had set up a donation drive for the Horning family.

 

Bootlegging case dismissed

A magistrate tossed a case of Christmas Eve bootlegging out of court, the Alaska Highway News reported on this day in history.

The charge against Martin Eidse was dismissed on Jan. 4, the News reported.

Two constables testified and a row of bottles seized during a raid was submitted as evidence.

Eidse claimed the liquor was for guests of his private party, and that the police raid spoiled "a hell of a good party," the News reported.

The magistrate agreed and said the amount of liquor was not unusual for the circumstance and dismissed the charge.

 

Car accidents increase

Car accidents in the North Peace showed a big increase in 1965.

There were 475 accidents for the year, well above the 295 reported in 1964, and 340 in 1963.

There were four traffic deaths in 1965, the same as in 1964. There were 77 injuries in 1965, up from only 19 the year prior.

Property damage for 1965 totalled $297,553, up from $222,068 in 1964.

 

Mathematician fined $25

Lloyd Esouloff attempted to prove by numerous figures that he had the right-of-way at an intersection in Aennofield when he crashed into a car driven by Carl Dayton.

Esouloff said his car did not enter the intersection at the same time, but was in fact there first, according to a report in the News.

The law said that the car coming from the right, in this case Dayton's, had the right-of-way. Esouloff was found guilty and fined $25.

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