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This day in history: Jan. 7, 1998

New Year's Day death treated as tragic accident A mother of two young girls was found frozen in the yard of her home on 116th Avenue on New Year's Day, the Peace River Block News reported on this day in 1998.
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The generosity of local residents over the 1997 holiday season helped the Salvation Army in Dawson Creek ensure everyone had enough to eat and that children found something under the tree Christmas morning. Capt. Lynn Pippy said the food filled the food bank's shelves and freezers. Though the food bank was empty in August, Pippy told the News there were enough supplies to fill hampers for the next four months.

New Year's Day death treated as tragic accident

A mother of two young girls was found frozen in the yard of her home on 116th Avenue on New Year's Day, the Peace River Block News reported on this day in 1998.

Police said they were treating the death as a tragic accident.

Katherine Hayter-Burton, 34, was out on New Year's Eve and decided to walk the three blocks home late at night, even though she wasn't dressed for the -30 C weather, the paper reported.

Dawson Creek coroner Joe Bilecki said an autopsy had been performed by Dr. Sonny Iloerta in Fort St. John, but the results were not in at the time of the reporting.

Bilecki declined to comment on the case, saying only that an autopsy is not an automatic requirement in cases such as this, but that he had reason to order one.

Dawson Creek RCMP did not issue a press release at the request of the victim's family, Sgt. Arlen Miller told the News.

Hayter-Burton was living with her two daughters aged six and eight. She was cremated earlier that week after a funeral service at Reynar's Funeral Home and Crematorium.

 

Annual food bank appeal a success

Then-Salvation Army Captain Lynn Pippy said the Christmas season was tremendously successful in 1997, with food and cash donations pouring in, the News reported on this day.

Pippy and her husband had worked in several communities, but told the News that Dawson Creek's generosity was overwhelming.

"A lot of people brought something but they brought more than one," she said. "They wouldn't just bring a Barbie doll. They would bring dresses and candy too. It was as if they were buying for their own children."

Money raised from the kettles and donations from service clubs, businesses and private individuals was enough to pick up the roughly $8,300 tab for the Christmas hampers.

"That food you donated at Christmas is going into the food bank to be used during the lean months," Pippy said. "We should be able to last until the end of April."

 

Pouce Coupe on list for casino

A destination casino at the Hart Hotel in Pouce Coupe had made the short list of proposals for gaming facilities released by the provincial government in 1998.

Del Folk and Cheryl Folk were the couple behind the proposal.

In all, the government's list contained 23 casino and bingo hall proposals that received support from their host and adjacent local governments.

At the time, the paper reported the casino could be operational within "a few months."

Thirteen of the 23 proposals were on First Nations reserves, as were six of the nine proposed bingo halls.

Powder King had also been accepted for the next stage of evaluation for a proposed casino.

Peter Clark, lotteries advisory committee chair, said the number of accepted proposals did not indicate the number of new facilities that would receive final approval.

Clark added that satisfying the host and adjacent local government requirements was only part of the process that also required a viable business plan complete with allowances for water, sewer and parking.

A detailed market assessment highlighting the total market potential of the proposed facility, as well as the potential impact on any existing gaming facility within the same market, was also needed, he added.

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