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This day in history: Nov. 24, 1986

Ethanol plant financing refused The B.C. Development Corporation turned down a Calgary company's request for a $45-million loan to help build an ethanol plant in Dawson Creek, the Alaska Highway News reported on this day in history.
history
Tony Brummet, MLA for Peace River North, signs his oath of office as Minister of Education on this day in history. Looking on are Bob Plecas (left), deputy provincial secretary, and Premier Bill Vander Zalm.

Ethanol plant financing refused

The B.C. Development Corporation turned down a Calgary company's request for a $45-million loan to help build an ethanol plant in Dawson Creek, the Alaska Highway News reported on this day in history.

The decision dealt the city a significant blow that could discourage future American business investors, then-mayor Bob Trail said.

Agri-Fuels Canada was seeking to build the project in the city, and had lined up $45 million from U.S. investors, half of the $90 million needed for the first phase of the project.

The four-phase plant had a price tag of $250 million, and would have created about 1,000 jobs in agriculture and related industries, the newspaper reported.

Trail was shocked by the decision, and concerned the corporation did not offer any reasons for the refusal.

Trail added the decision didn't bode well for the province, calling it a "horror story" that would circulate in the American investment community.

 

Fort St. John Mountie honoured for heroics

Fort St. John RCMP Cst. Bruce Hailey was set to be honoured in a ceremony in Victoria for rescuing a man from a burning truck, it was reported on this day in history.

Hailey leapt into action on Sept. 25, 1986, pulling a driver from the cab of his burning truck "at considerable risk to himself."

Details of how and where the truck caught fire weren't reported.

Hailey was to be honoured for his quick thinking, decisive action, and disregard for his own safety, it was reported.

 

Knott finally gets his bonspiel win

It may have taken them nearly two decades, but Gerald Knott and his D and G Oil Services team finally won the A event final of the Oilmen's Bonspiel.

Knott won the event at the 26th annual bonspiel in 1986, when Dave Wallace and his Franklin Supply #1 team was unable to make their final shot. Knott won the game 7-6.

"Finally, after 19 years of trying, we won the A," Knott told the Alaska Highway News after the game.

"I've won other events in the past, but never the big one."

With his last rock in the 10th end, Knott was able to draw to the top of the button. That left Knott sitting first and third shot with a Wallace stone sandwiched in between, the newspaper reported.

Wallace attempted to split out the counter with the game's final shot, but was slightly narrow. He drove the shot rock onto one of his own and rolled out both his second shot, the Knott shot rock, and his shooter.

That left Knott with the only rock in play and the one point needed to steal the victory.

"I thought (Wallace) had a good shot," Knott said. "Dave's a good takeout player and I was surprised the way the rocks reacted on his last shot."

Knott trailed by two in the ninth and was able to tie the game with a free draw for his pair.

 

Alberta mulls wolf cull

An Alberta biologist said wolves would have to be killed for years to help save a threatened caribou herd in the Grande Cache-Willmore area of western Alberta, it was reported on this day in history.

"We must do all we can to get the caribou through this period," said Joan Snyder of the Environment Council of Alberta, who studied mountain caribou habitat.

"But if all we do is kill wolves for one year, it will be useless."

Alberta's Fish and Wildlife department had proposed to kill 70 per cent of the wolves in the mountains west of Edmonton, it was reported, with population control spread out over three to four years.

Wolves, a natural predator of the caribou, must be controlled over a long period to enable herd populations to recover, Snyder said.

Other biologists, however, said wolves could quickly recover from such a cull, and return to original population levels, or higher, in only a few years.