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This day in history: Sept. 4, 1987

Canadian Hunter announces gas exploration plans Canadian Hunter Exploration officials outlined major plans for natural gas exploration and production in the Deep Basin gas field south of Dawson Creek.
history
Elementary students were busy buying supplies for the first day of school in this 1987 photo. As their summer holidays end, their thoughts will likely be of returning to the classroom and meeting their old friends and new teachers.

Canadian Hunter announces gas exploration plans

Canadian Hunter Exploration officials outlined major plans for natural gas exploration and production in the Deep Basin gas field south of Dawson Creek.

Canadian Hunter said it could drill as many as 250 wells southwest of Dawson Creek in the next decade.

Ed Terras, district manager for Canadian Hunter at the company’s Fort St. John office, indicated to city officials the company planned to drill 17 wells in the winter and increase drilling until reaching a possible peak of 30 wells a year in three years time, depending on the field.

Canadian Hunter, a subsidiary of Noranda Inc., pioneered drilling in the Elmsworth Field of the Deep Basin area on the Alberta side of the border and in recent years, had been expanding operations into B.C. in April. Canadian Hunter executive vice-president Jim Gray expressed his company’s conviction that the Deep Basin reserve extended well into British Columbia.

Plans also included a major gas processing plant south of Highway 97, along the Fellers Heights loop, as well as a new gas line linking the Puggins Mountain area with Westcost Transmission’s Pine Pass line.

The project would cost $32.4 million in 1987, $71.1 million in 1988, and an average of $40 million annually until 1996.

 

Northern Lights College brings in new program

The Dawson Creek campus of the Northern Lights College announced it was pioneering a course in entrepreneurship by making available a unique manufacturing program.

“We found in recent years that our students graduating in the trades had no employment to go to,” Jim Kassen, chief executive officer of the college said in a 1987 interview with the Peace River Block News. “So, we decided to look for a program that would allow people to create their own jobs.”

Students in the manufacturing/entrepreneurship program would start by learning the basics of welding and fabrication, carpentry and plastics. The students would then make a prototype product, produce it in quantity, and learn to market it, all under the guidance of local businessman Peter Diemert.

“I hope by the time they hang out their shingle they will be well prepared and able to avoid some of the pitfalls small businesses encounter,” Diemert said.