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UPDATE: Road name request postponed

Parkwood developers proposing road names in the Beaver language
Parkwood-Rendering-FSJ
A rendering of the Parkwood development in Fort St. John (Supplied)

Update, Sept. 23, 10 a.m.:

XJ Evergreen Estates Corp. and the City of Fort St. John say the council report regarding the road names request for the Parkwood development has been postponed pending ongoing consultations, and will come forward to a future meeting. The report in question has been removed.

Construction continues on the first phase of Parkwood Southlands, which broke ground last summer.

The development is planned to one day see up to 3,400 new homes, 50 acres of parks and natural areas, and a mix of new commercial and institutional development. 


Original story:

A major new Fort St. John neighbourhood currently under development may one day be home to street names of cultural significance to local First Nations.

XJ Evergreen Estates is seeking city council approval of a number of proposed names for the road network in Parkwood Southlands along the West Bypass Road.

While Parkwood Drive would be the the key road into the development, the developers are requesting a number of other road names in the Beaver language, including:

  • Madziih Trail — translating to Caribou Trail in English;
  • Che’Kaa Drive — translating to Muskrat Drive;
  • Sus Place — translating to Bear Place;
  • Hadaa Way — translating to Moose Way; and
  • Lhuuge Eh Tane View — translating to Fish Trail View.

“Staff have had positive and extensive discussions with the proponent and representatives from Doig River First Nation, on the proposed road names in the Beaver language,” reads a Sept. 26 staff report to council.

“Those proposed names are supported by Doig River and hold cultural significance for the area in and around the future Parkwood neighbourhood.”

The development is planned to one day see up to 3,400 new homes, 50 acres of parks and natural areas, and a mix of new commercial and institutional development. 

Developers are also looking to name one road Edelweiss Avenue, acknowledging their Swiss heritage and grandparents who immigrated to Fort St. John in 1950, according to the council report.

The white edelweiss mountain flower "signifies noble purity" and developers say they plan to the incorporate the flower into its landscape plantings, according to the report.

City council meets Monday afternoon.


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