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Northeast B.C. federal election results finalized

Federal election results in Northeast B.C. have been validated by the returning officer, confirming incumbent Conservative MP Bob Zimmer will represent the region when Parliament resumes later this fall.
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Federal election results in Northeast B.C. have been validated by the returning officer, confirming incumbent Conservative MP Bob Zimmer will represent the region when Parliament resumes later this fall.

According to Elections Canada, there was a total 49,627 votes cast in the Prince George-Peace River-Northern Rockies riding, of which 430 ballots were rejected. Of the 49,197 valid votes, the results were:

  • Bob Zimmer (Conservative) - 29,882 (60.7%)

  • Cory Grizz Longley (NDP) - 6,647 (13.5%)

  • Ryan Dyck (People’s Party) - 5,138 (10.4%)

  • Amir Alavi (Liberal) - 4,236 (8.6%)

  • Catharine Kendall (Green) - 1,661 (3.4%)

  • David Jeffers - (Maverick) - 1,580 (3.2%)

  • Phil Hewkin (CCF) - 53 (0.1%)

Nationally, the Liberals were elected to a minority government with 159 seats, followed by the Conservatives with 119 seats, the Bloc Québécois 33, the New Democrats 25, and the Greens just two.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he will name his cabinet next month and Parliament will resume sometime in the fall. Chrystia Freeland will remain as deputy prime minister and the country's finance minister.

Disavowed Liberal candidate Kevin Vuong has said he will sit as Independent MP in the downtown Toronto riding of Spadina-Fort York, despite controversy over a sexual assault charge laid against him in 2019 and which was later dropped.

In Alberta, defeated Conservative incumbent Jag Sahota plans to ask the courts to quash the election results in the riding of Calgary Skyview, given allegations of dirty tricks by the Liberal victor, George Chahal.

It's unclear whether parliamentarians will be required to return to in-person sittings, or whether they will be allowed to again attend House of Commons proceedings virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

While parties previously allowed virtual attendance, those provisions expired when Parliament rose in June, and parties say talks on whether to revive that approach won't start in earnest until the cabinet is announced.

The Canadian Press reports that Conservative MPs will make their way to Ottawa next week to have their first caucus meeting since the election, where they will have to decide whether they want to review O'Toole's leadership. 

— with files from The Canadian Press


Email Managing Editor Matt Preprost at editor@ahnfsj.ca