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Northern mayors, chiefs meet to discuss community reconcilation

Local mayors and Treaty 8 First Nations chiefs in Northeast B.C. met earlier this month in what is being described as a “momentous first step” on taking action on reconciliation.
doig-river-drummers
The Doig River Drummers came to share traditional songs with the crowd.

Local mayors and Treaty 8 First Nations chiefs in Northeast B.C. met earlier this month in what is being described as a “momentous first step” on taking action on reconciliation.

Seven mayors and six chiefs from McLeod Lake to Fort Nelson met virtually on Oct. 15 "to initiate discussions to work towards reconciliation at a community level,” according to a release.

“It is a great opportunity to work together, collaborate, find solutions to reconcile past differences, built powerful relationships based on mutual respect, understanding and to share a common vision for our future while celebrating our diverse languages and cultures,” Fort Nelson First Nation Chief Sharleen Gale said in a statement.

From the meeting, "it was obvious that there are opportunities to learn together, partner, and ensure all our residents have access to the basics of life," the release stated.

“We live together in a nation that must acknowledge its past and work towards reconciliation,” said Fort St. John Mayor Lori Ackerman in a statement. “True reconciliation means action and communities can and must work together to resolve issues so that our grandchildren’s grandchildren don’t inherit this mess; today was a beautiful start.”

"We share in hardships, challenges, accomplishments and successes,” said West Moberly First Nations Chief Roland Willson. “[West Moberly First Nations] strives to be good neighbors, we may not always agree but should take the time to understand and accept each other. It only makes sense to understand and support each otherwhere and when we can!”