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At The Movies With Peter Clease: Morning Glory

News is news -- well, not quite: -- it is also entertainment -- well, not quite; -- no, perhaps it is pure discourse?--if again that?--some colloquial engine? -- not quite; not quite; not quite--; if it has some purpose, perhaps its purpose is to see


News is news -- well, not quite: -- it is also entertainment -- well, not quite; -- no, perhaps it is pure discourse?--if again that?--some colloquial engine? -- not quite; not quite; not quite--; if it has some purpose, perhaps its purpose is to seek a purpose, and from that purpose seek new purpose in other purposes -- confused? -- perhaps that is the point: to be confused; or, perhaps, it is to be confused about being confused and this elicits excitement in day's and week's news.


Anyway, this is what seems to be the point of "Morning Glory"--except not. It is, then, about news; and, then, it is not about news--it, instead, pretends to be about something, and that something is not news, which would be fine if it were not set in a newspaper! with news people! discussing news, forwarding news, talking about news! bitching about news, yelling about news, telling stories of old news and -- again! -- whining that news is no longer news which, by the way, is the most interesting part of the film, a fact that does not provide the film with good news.


News is as much news in this reporting fantasy as are mice friending cats; though, the latter far more possible, even as the one gnaws on the other, the mouse to the cat of course. However, from how this film plays out, there are snide little things that tease quality when out of context. --Two: Rachel McAdams and Harrison Ford. --She is goodish. --He is better. In the film, McAdams is the plucky, plucky, plucky type, ambitious, overly diligent and for most of the running, something of an asexual: hence, the typical reporter. She is also the main character, one whose name vexes me -- but I am quite terrible with names -- ah! Becky Fuller -- and she is the new producer of a hack morning show that fails over and again, that is until... she enters... the scene, which is as trite as it sounds. She is quite easy to watch, though, which is due to McAdams. Several other characters, some who are very, very, very enthusiastic!! range from tolerable to sporadically comically interesting -- which brings me to Ford, the Mike Pomeroy! who is sardonic, vicious, mean, cruel, insulting, and I find utterly hilarious! He also, apparently, makes a mean frittata.


The positives, despite them, are not enough to save the film, which never avoids formula. It has a meaningless romance between McAdams and a throwaway character, and there is not a moment when what is going on is not foreseeable. Most of the characters are stereotypes, not in a satiric way either -- quite literal -- and even the better characters (Becky; Mike) are nothing more than sit-com second rates (save for most of Mike). The news is not the news in this film, and other new news is sure to be news to it.

3 out of 5 popcorns.