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At The Movies With Peter Clease: Unstoppable

It is under my demand and command that I assume and, through assumption, know everything and all about you. --Most all of all things you. I can sense you; I sense you reading.


It is under my demand and command that I assume and, through assumption, know everything and all about you. --Most all of all things you. I can sense you; I sense you reading. But, as this is so, now so, controlling my expanding senses, castigating and noting you, it seems most improper, a gray mistake, a mistake to ever unveil my source of how and why I know such things. I simply, most very simply know. And since this is how things are, it seems proper to dispense with these calculating summaries and direct myself through the fanfares of your powerless subconscious. I begin. I see. You now, your attention, your mind gallery is easily susceptible to my witch-crafting, psyche-whipping scrupulous pull. You are doomed to my perception as a tiny ant is to a foot; and you are better off talking to that very ant than to resist my persuasion.


I have reached a small portrait of you and perceive you well. And I perceive that you find trains a fascination, and perhaps as with people, how they move and they internally work, how they are treated and how they run on and on and on forever and ever and ever. And if I have perceived you well, then "Unstoppable" may spur you on for an hour--or so--of delightfulness; do I, however, having said this, suggest others will hate it? Not so. I have for quite some time had a deep-seeded hatred for all creatures (machine or otherwise) that meow or that intend to chugga-chugga-choo-choo! -- but, despite this, I found this film well done escapism, albeit with the dimension of a kitchen oven, with a bit of workable, albeit heavy-handed, acidic (nicely) wit.


In regards to its other more dramatic and aesthetic merits: -- its deep, personal characterizations, its timely satirical riffs and the inventive narrative risks it pulls through with undulating twists; in addition, one must of course mention its damning sense of originally, which, intellectually and physically, reminds us of some great Wellesian production -- ah, but if only this were in reality's vision and not some cruel, cruel hoax which, by the way, could have been extended to include comparison's to Picasso, Beethoven and Whitman.


Now, the irony is that this film, while not "Leaves of Grass," is still a great genre film. -- okay! Alright, "Unstoppable" seems to be a perfectly stripped down work of brainless adrenaline, and everything is perfectly adequate, including the so-so acting by Washington, Pine and Dawson. As it is, it can be described in so many words: it begins well, middles well and ends kind of well.

3.5 out of 5 popcorns