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John Grady: Our legacy

As much as we try, we cannot control our legacy as it is subject to other’s interpretations
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John Grady: "As much as we try, we cannot control our legacy as many times it is subject to other’s interpretations, health, age and other factors, but what is most interesting is God who has His own ways of establishing legacy for each one of us without us knowing it."

A question often asked of ourselves, especially as we begin to age in life, is: What is my legacy? 

When we are younger, we are normally working through a maze of issues like maturing, character development, education or trade, relationships and marriage, job or career development, faith, travel, and the list goes on and on.

As we settle into our second stage, we develop into our family life and our professional careers, trying to balance the challenges of careers and family. It can be a time when we excel in our professional giftings, and opportunities arise that lead us into a reputation in a certain field of excellence and supposed legacy.

We often see in our later years all our priorities and efforts changed and family legacy is restored. As we read the traditional obituaries, (realizing there are exceptions) they normally focus on a few items: 1. Family members, both ones that preceded and ones remaining; 2. Faith, if any 3; Occupation; and 4. Where lived.

As much as we try, we cannot control our legacy as many times it is subject to other’s interpretations, health, age and other factors, but what is most interesting is God who has His own ways of establishing legacy for each one of us without us knowing it.

A case in point is the life of Leah, who was the oldest daughter of Laban. Jacob, in his younger days, was known as a deceiver but later had his name changed from Jacob to Israel by the Lord. He was working for Laban and fell in love with Laban’s youngest daughter, Rachael. He agreed to work for seven years for Laban to then marry Rachael, but Laban deceived him and tricked him into marrying Leah instead. Jacob then agreed to work another seven years for Laban and then he could then marry Rachael, which he did.

With Leah, who was unloved, they produced six sons but let’s examine the legacy of two of Leah’s sons and what was accomplished through them.

The third son was Levi, whose lineage became the priesthood for the Israelites, the birthing of Moses, who led the Israelites out of Egypt through the wilderness so they could enter the Promised Land, who mentored Joshua of walking in the presence of the Lord, established the Ten Commandments, the Tabernacle, the writing of the first five books of the old Testament, etc.

The fourth son was Judah and through his lineage came David, the shepherd boy who conquered Goliath, the psalmist and king, and through David’s lineage came Jesus who is Messiah, Yeshua, the Savior of the world.

Did Leah have any idea of her legacy? Of course not, but God knew and what a legacy was left through what the bible describes as this unloved lady but loved by God. We are to be encouraged that God has a way of writing a script of legacy for each of us if we allow Him without us knowing and it will last.

Who would not want to hear these words from Him at the end of life, “Well done thy good and faithful servant?”


John Grady lives and writes in Fort St. John.