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Site C workforce at 4,785 in February

The workforce at Site C grew by more than 400 in February, with 4,785 reported, according to the latest employment figures from BC Hydro. It's not quite the peak the workforce reached in August 2019.
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Aerial view of the Site C powerhouse, generating station, and spillway under construction, February 2020.

The workforce at Site C grew by more than 400 in February, with 4,785 reported, according to the latest employment figures from BC Hydro.

It's not quite the peak the workforce reached in August 2019. And it’s not quite the workforce being reported at camp, where 979 workers were reported as of April 7.

Workforce numbers are collected monthly from contractors. February numbers though do appear in line with what BC Hydro said would be its busiest construction year.

The COVID-19 pandemic however has since slowed much of that down, with work effectively stopped on the powerhouse and spillways. BC Hydro has focused work on its river diversion system to meet a September deadline, and on Highway 29 clearing and road realignment, and transmission line construction.

Of the February workforce, around 16% was local, with 750 Peace region residents employed as construction and non-construction contractors, up 74 from January.

Locals made up 19% of the construction and non-construction workforce total of 40,29 workers, which includes work at the dam site, on transmission corridors, reservoir clearing, public roadworks, and camp accommodations.

There were 3,400 B.C. workers, or 71%, working for construction and non-construction contractors, and in engineering and project team jobs.

BC Hydro reported 210 apprentices (+45), 359 indigenous workers (+24), and 460 women workers (+37) on the project. There were 8 temporary foreign workers employed in specialized positions, Hydro says, and another 57 managers and other professionals working under the federal international mobility program.

Of the workforce, nearly 40% were labourers (675), heavy equipment operators (625), and carpenters and scaffolders (625).

There were another 425 engineers, and 225 construction managers and supervisors reported. There were less than 100 workers reported in various other trades, including boilermakers, crane operators, electricians, mechanics, millwrights, pipe fitters, and welders. There were about 50 healthcare workers reported. 

View the employment report in full by clicking here.

Email Managing Editor Matt Preprost at editor@ahnfsj.ca.